Dr. Mills Named 2015 Champion of Colorectal Cancer Prevention

Preventing Colorectal Cancer Names 2015 Champions of Colorectal Cancer Prevention

Annual Award Celebrates Great Achievements in Colorectal Cancer Awareness

Preventing Colorectal Cancer (PCC) announces the recipients of the 2015 PCC Champion Award for Colorectal Cancer Prevention, an honor the not-for-profit organization established in 2011 to recognize individuals, groups and companies that provide either exceptionally high standards of care or that most effectively advocate for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer.

PCC is proud to honor Michael R. Mills, MD and Ernestine Hambrick, MD as the recipients of this year’s Champion Awards. These individuals exemplify PCC’s mission to educate both public and private stakeholders about the opportunities to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer through promoting effective screening, prevention and care options for patients.

“We want to spotlight those who share PCC’s deep commitment to high-quality screening and show exemplary support of the fight against colorectal cancer,” says C. Taney Hamill, chair of the PCC Champion Awards committee and Vice President of the Visiting Nurse Associations of America. “The clinical and financial benefits of a colonoscopy are well supported in the health care industry as a reliable screening tool to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer.”

About the 2015 Champion Award recipients:

  • Michael R. Mills, MD: Dr. Mills is a dedicated advocate for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer through his community outreach programs, including St. Vincent de Paul Medical Clinic, where he volunteers regularly, and the CDC-AGA “free colonoscopy” awareness day in Arizona that he leads. In addition to community outreach efforts, Dr. Mills is the program director for two gastrointestinal electives at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine, where he instills in his students how to best win the fight against colorectal cancer.
  • Ernestine Hambrick, MD: Dr. Hambrick was the first woman board-certified colon and rectal surgeon in the U.S. After 25 years at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, she left her practice in 1998 to create the STOP Colon/Rectal Cancer Foundation, a national education initiative. STOP remains a partner of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, which takes place in March. In addition to her advocacy, Dr. Hambrick has published 20 articles on colorectal surgery and cancer. She is a member of relevant professional societies, including the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, and has received many distinct honors, such as “100 Women Making a Difference” and the “Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare”.

“The selection committee felt that Dr. Mills and Dr. Hambrick have gone above and beyond to promote colorectal cancer screenings in an effort to save lives,” says Stanford R. Plavin, MD, vice chair of PCC and president and managing partner of Ambulatory Anesthesia of Atlanta. “Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in minority populations, and this year’s winners have achieved results consistent with the highest national benchmarks while serving a very large community.”

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18 Simple Snacks to Empower Healthy Living

by Alyssa Simpson, RD, CDE, CLT

This month’s issue is dedicated to snacking! Whether you are looking for a sweet snack, salty snack, or just an easy snack, this month I am providing you with real food snack solutions. Preparing and eating foods that fuel you will empowering you to succeed and is key to long term health and well-being.

A few simple things to remember when you are planning your snacks:

The simpler the ingredients, the better.
The simpler the transportation time from land to mouth, the better.
The simpler the prep time, the better.
The simpler the food, the better.

What is your favorite snack? Share with me today!

18 Simple Snacks to Empower Healthy Living

  1. Raw veggies and hummus. A few of my favorite raw veggies to pair with hummus include: red bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, broccoli, and sugar snap peas.
  2. Fresh fruits and nuts and seeds. Get creative by mixing things up – clean eating is also about variety! Try pistachios, almonds, cashews, walnuts, macadamia nuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds…just to name a few. Pair them with a variety of fruits such as berries, kiwis, oranges, grapefruit, apples, mangoes, grapes, bananas, peaches or pears…as you can see the list can go on!
  3. Greek yogurt mixed with herbs served with raw veggies. Try mixing nonfat Greek yogurt with fresh rosemary and serve with your favorite raw veggies such as cherry tomatoes, celery, cucumbers, bell peppers, and carrots.
  4. Pecans and dried cranberries.
  5. Fresh fruit smoothie made with frozen berries, almond milk, Greek yogurt, and chia seeds.
  6. Hard boiled egg with fresh fruit.
  7. Ezekiel cereal with Greek yogurt or almond milk.
  8. Smoked turkey breast topped with avocado and tomato slices.
  9. Apple or celery with almond, peanut, or cashew butter.
  10. Chicken lettuce wraps with bibb lettuce, avocado, and roasted red pepper.
  11. Sprouted grain bread with almond, peanut, or cashew butter and topped with fresh sliced strawberries.
  12. Fresh guacamole and veggies!  Forget the chips and try dipping red bell peppers, sugar snap peas and cherry tomatoes in your favorite guacamole recipe! Dining out? Ask the server if they will bring cucumber slices instead of chips.
  13. Cottage cheese mixed with fresh blueberries and sunflower seeds.
  14. Dark Chocolate. The darker the chocolate the better. Aim for 70% or higher for the most antioxidant benefits. If portion control is a problem, then avoid buying the big chocolate bar and instead go for pre-portioned squares of dark chocolate.
  15. Melted chocolate and fresh fruit. If you want to serve up a fancy sweet treat try melting some chocolate and then serving with fresh fruit such as strawberries, apples, bananas, and pineapple chunks.
  16. Trail mix with Greek yogurt. Take about 1/8 – 1/4 cup trail mix – the type with nuts, dried fruit, and a little bit of chocolate and mix with your Greek yogurt….yummy!
  17. Baked apple chips served with slivered almonds and topped with cinnamon.
  18. Whole grain chips with black bean dip.

Homemade Almond Butter

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup whole natural almonds, roasted*
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 3 tbs. almond or vegetable oil

Preparation:

In food processor with metal blade in place, grind almonds and salt until fine. While the food processor is running, slowly add oil in a steady stream until mixture is spreadable.

*To roast almonds, spread on an ungreased baking pan. Place in a 350ºF oven and bake 7 to 10 minutes or until almonds are fragrant; stir once or twice to assure even browning. Note that almonds will continue to roast slightly after removing from oven. Makes 3/4 cup, or 6 servings

Nutrition Info: Calories 130, Fat 12 gm, Sat Fat 1 gm, Mono Fat 8 gram, Protein 4 gm, Carbs 4 gm, Fiber 2 grams, Cholesterol 0 mg, Sodium 0 mg, Calcium 48 mg, Magnesium 53 mg, Potassium 139 mg, Vitamin E 6 mg
– Click here to see more

4 Grab and Go Snacks I Love

We live in a very busy and fast paced society. Here is a list portable and easy to grab snacks:

  1. Lara bars.They are pure date, nut, and fruit bars. The ingredient list is never long or filled with fancy words you cannot pronounce, but the taste is delicious. I am sure you will find a variety that suits your needs.
  2. Orgain Nutritional Shakes.These ready to drink shakes are the perfect grab and go option for living a lean life on the road. If you are looking for a mini-meal replacement you could even pair this with a serving of nuts and you will have a 300 – 350 calorie meal that is balanced with carbohydrates, protein, and fat.
  3. 100 calorie packs of nuts. Pre-portioned almonds and walnuts makes clean snacking easy; add a piece of fresh fruit and you have the perfect snack.
  4. Pre-portioned natural peanut or almond butter such as Justin’s brand.If you love nut butters but struggle with portion control then these are the perfect solution for you. They can be found in pre-portioned servings anywhere from 90 – 200 calories a serving and are easy to add to apple or celery slices. Try mixing your favorite nut butter with Greek yogurt…talk about a delicious and satisfying treat!

Quote of the Month

“Those who have no time for healthy eating will sooner or later have to find time for illness”

News and Events: Do you live in the East Valley and dread driving to Phoenix for appointments?  Visit me at the Mesa office on Mondays (by appointment); major cross streets are Dobson and the US-60. Phone consultations are also available on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays if distance or travel time is an issue. You could have your nutrition consultation over your lunch break and not miss a minute of work!                                           Call (602) 422-9800 to schedule.

The Art of Mindful Eating

by Alyssa Simpson, RD, CDE, CLT

Mindful eating is practicing awareness. Being aware of what you eat, why you eat and when you eat is the key to staying mindful. Mindful eating is a lifestyle, not a diet. When you start to eat for your health it is easier to stick to healthy eating habits. Remember that looking and feeling good comes along with it. Working with a registered dietitian can help you learn how to transform your eating habits and behavior from a “diet” mentality to a more mindful approach to weight loss.

Start with these easy tips below to begin eating mindfully:

Build a better relationship with food. Learn to enjoy food and be mindful while doing it. Instead of just eating an apple, think about where the apple came from, the people who grew it, the way it tastes and the nourishment it is providing to your body.

Listen to your hunger cues. Ask yourself are you really hungry? You may find that you are eating because you are bored, stressed, anxious, or sad. Whatever the reason, find out what’s “eating” you? Understanding your triggers for emotional eating is the first step in changing behaviors. If you tend to eat when you’re stressed, find an activity to do to combat the stress rather than eating for comfort. Call a friend to vent, take a brisk walk, listen to music, do a yoga video, etc. Have an action plan in place so that you are not tempted to reach for that tub of ice cream.

Avoid distractions. Try to avoid distractions such as watching TV, reading or driving while eating. When you eat without distractions you are fully aware, in the moment and can focus on how it tastes, how it feels in your mouth, how your body responds to it, etc. Without distractions, you can pay closer attention to your satiety cues and know when you’ve had enough versus mindlessly eating through a bag of potato chips during your favorite TV show.

Take time during and after meals. To avoid eating meals too fast, try putting your fork down in between bites and chewing food thoroughly. Slowing down during meal time will allow your body to know when it is full. Have a planned activity right after you finish a meal to get your mind off of eating and avoid the temptation of eating further, such as taking a walk, washing the dishes, reading a book, etc.

Mindful eating takes practice to achieve. Remember to eat for your health, savor and enjoy your food. With time mindful eating will become a way of life. Diets are temporary and so are the results, but a lifestyle change will have the most beneficial impact on your health and well-being.

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